Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMartineau T.
dc.contributor.authorMirzoev T.
dc.contributor.authorPearson S.
dc.contributor.authorHa B.T.T.
dc.contributor.authorXu Q.
dc.contributor.authorRamani K.V.
dc.contributor.authorLiu X.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-11T10:16:18Z
dc.date.available2022-02-11T10:16:18Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationMartineau, T., Mirzoev, T., Pearson, S., Ha, B. T. T., Xu, Q., Ramani, K. v., & Liu, X. (2015). Coherence between health policy and human resource strategy: Lessons from maternal health in Vietnam, India and China. Health Policy and Planning, 30(1). https://doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czt102
dc.identifier.issn2681080
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czt102
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11718/25376
dc.description.abstractThe failure to meet health goals such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) is partly due to the lack of appropriate resources for the effective implementation of health policies. The lack of coherence between the health policies and human resource (HR) strategy is one of the major causes. This article explores the relationship and the degree of coherence between health policy - in this case maternal health policy - processes and HR strategy in Vietnam, China and India in the period 2005-09. Four maternal health policy case studies were explored [skilled birth attendance (SBA), adolescent and sexual reproductive health, domestic violence and medical termination of pregnancy] across three countries through interviews with key respondents, document analysis and stakeholder meetings. Analysis for coherence between health policy and HR strategy was informed by a typology covering 'separation', 'fit' and 'dialogue'. Regarding coherence we found examples of complete separation between health policy and HR strategy, a good fit with the SBA policy though modified through 'dialogue' in Vietnam, and in one case a good fit between policy and strategy was developed through successive evaluations. Three key influences on coherence between health policy and HR strategy emerge from our findings: (1) health as the lead sector, (2) the nature of the policy instrument and (3) the presence of 'HR champions'. Finally, we present a simple algorithm to ensure that appropriate HR related actors are involved; HR is considered at the policy development stage with the option of modifying the policy if it cannot be adequately supported by the available health workforce; and ensuring that HR strategies are monitored to ensure continued coherence with the health policy. This approach will ensure that the health workforce contributes more effectively to meeting the MDGs and future health goals. � The Author 2013; all rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Policy and Planning
dc.subjectHealth policy
dc.subjecthuman resources
dc.subjectmaternal health
dc.subjectpolicy analysis
dc.titleCoherence between health policy and human resource strategy: Lessons from maternal health in Vietnam, India and China
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
dc.contributor.affiliationDepartment of International Public Health, Liverpool School of Tropical MedicineL3 5QA, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.affiliationNuffield Centre for International Health and Development, University of LeedsLS2 9LJ, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.affiliationHanoi School of Public Health, 138 Giang vo, Ba Dinh, Viet Nam
dc.contributor.affiliationSchool of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China
dc.contributor.affiliationPublic Systems Group, Centre for Management of Health Services, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, 380 015, India
dc.contributor.affiliationChina Centre for Health Development Studies, Peking University, Mailbox 505, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China
dc.contributor.institutionauthorMartineau, T., Department of International Public Health, Liverpool School of Tropical MedicineL3 5QA, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionauthorMirzoev, T., Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development, University of LeedsLS2 9LJ, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionauthorPearson, S., Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development, University of LeedsLS2 9LJ, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionauthorHa, B.T.T., Hanoi School of Public Health, 138 Giang vo, Ba Dinh, Viet Nam
dc.contributor.institutionauthorXu, Q., School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China
dc.contributor.institutionauthorRamani, K.V., Public Systems Group, Centre for Management of Health Services, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, 380 015, India
dc.contributor.institutionauthorLiu, X., China Centre for Health Development Studies, Peking University, Mailbox 505, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China
dc.description.scopusid57203500736
dc.description.scopusid15070894300
dc.description.scopusid55644537600
dc.description.scopusid56209932000
dc.description.scopusid56580824400
dc.description.scopusid7006683305
dc.description.scopusid57209813645
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/heapol/czt102
dc.identifier.endpage120
dc.identifier.startpage111
dc.identifier.issue1
dc.identifier.volume30


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Open Access Journal Articles [323]
    The open-access journal articles collection includes articles published by faculty/researcher of Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad in Gold/Diamond/ Hybrid/Green Open Access Journal. The Gold/Diamond Open Access Journals are those which published research articles as open access and are primarily licensed under the creative commons.

Show simple item record